Ice Climbing and Hiking on Glaciers

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Iceland’s nickname is ‘The land of Ice and Fire.’ The fire part is our volcanos, if you want to learn about whether you can see an erupting volcano on your visit click here. As for the ice, that is our incredible glaciers that take up about 10% of our land, and almost everyone who visits our shores wants to see them, and we totally understand why!

There are day tours to take you away from Reykjavik, into the countryside to see these icy wonders. One of the most popular places to visit is the glacier lagoon, sometimes you can see the front of the glacier calving here, causing great new icebergs to fall into the lagoon, making big waves so please stay back from the edge of the water, and don’t even think about climbing on the floating icebergs – they flip over as they melt, very quickly and you don’t want to be underneath one!

Once free in the lagoon the icebergs make their way out to sea, with seals hunting all around them! Sometimes the chunks of ice get swept back onto the black sand beach, and melt in the sun, looking like diamonds, hence the name, Diamond Beach! Not all glaciers are clear and blue though, Sólheimajökull is a glacier near the infamous Eyjafjallajökull. When it went off in 2010 the fine ash cloud it created covered Europe, and stopped almost all air travel! If you visit it, we recommend Iceland Discover’s South coast tour, you will see the ash and debris from that, and other eruptions, in layers within the ice, making it a bit stripey!

 

https://seatrips.is/glacier/

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Voek Baths
Plunge into Iceland’s purest hot spring water, bath in floating pools out on the lake. Vök Baths is a new destination opened in summer 2019 by lake Urriðavatn, just northwest from Egilsstaðir, in Eastern Iceland. It features the first floating pools in Iceland. Located in Eastern Iceland, still one of the most untouched places on the island, Vök Baths offer a new bathing experience and the perfect stop for travellers to rest and rejuvenate by the crystal clear waters of Urriðavatn lake along their journeys. The 75-degrees warm water streams from hot springs deep under the lake. Years ago, during the long arctic winters, the locals noticed that the lake ice always melted in the same place. The name, Vök, is the Icelandic word for these melted ice holes. http://www.visitegilsstadir.is/en/things-to-see/vok-baths-hot-water-springs-at-lake-urridavatn
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East Iceland Heritage Museum
The East is the only part of Iceland where you will find wild reindeer. They contribute to the unique nature and are strongly connected to the region’s history and culture. The focus of the exhibition is on the reindeer's nature, characteristics and survival, as well as reindeer hunting and how reindeer products have been used in fashion design and handcraft. On display are items from the historical old rural community of East Iceland that lasted until the mid-20th century. Some items relate their practical roles in everyday life, while others bear witness to the fact that life was not only about basic survival but also about creating beautiful things for decoration and pleasure. http://www.visitegilsstadir.is/en/things-to-see/east-iceland-heritage-museum
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Skriduklaustur
Skriðuklaustur is an ancient manor estate in Fljótsdalur. From 1493 - 1552 a monastery operated there. In the years 2002 - 2012 an extensive archaeological excavation took place on the cloister ruins which are now open to visitors. The writer Gunnar Gunnarsson (1889 - 1975) bought Skriðklaustur in 1939 and built a large house there designed by the German architect Fritz Höger. The writer moved to Reykjavík in 1948 and donated Skriðuklaustur to the Icelandic nation. In 2000 the institute of Gunnar Gunnarsson resumed operation in Skriðuklaustur as a centre of culture and history. In the summertime, Skriðuklaustur comes alive with various exhibitions, cultural happenings and guided tours for visitors around the writer's house and the archaeological site. http://www.visitegilsstadir.is/en/things-to-see/skriduklaustur
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Fardagafoss
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Hikes in Iceland

7 November 2023

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